NYPA Initiatives

President John F. Kennedy Niagara Power Project Dedication

The New York Power Authority wishes you a Happy Independence Day!

Transcript:

From the President’s Office in the White House – February 4, 1961

This is President John F. Kennedy speaking from the White House. You have gathered here today to celebrate the delivery of the first power from the fabulous Niagara Power Project and I am happy to join with you, your fellow trustees, staff, consultants, contractors and workers, in this field, in welcoming this great achievement.

This 720 million dollar project, financed privately, and scheduled to deliver 1,800,000 kilowatts of firm power when the last of the turbines and generators are installed – begins to function 3 years from the time of groundbreaking.

An outstanding engineering achievement and a happy example of teamwork and cooperation between private and public enterprises.

This project will ensure constant, adequate and low-priced power for the highly industrialized Niagara Frontier and for the preferred customers – the rural and domestic consumers.

All this was made possible by the 1950 Treaty with Canada, signed by President Truman, approved by the Congress and supported by President Eisenhower.

This great Power Project signifies a new and more prosperous era for the Niagara Frontier and is an example to the world of North American efficiency and determination.

I congratulate you all.

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Summer Intern Series

Summer Intern Series: Dean King

IMG_3572 (1)The New York Power Authority’s (NYPA) intern program provides top college students with the opportunity to gain broad experience working for the nation’s largest public power organization.

Dean King is an undergrad at Clarkson University, where he is pursuing a degree in Electrical Engineering. He currently works in the Electrical Maintenance Department at the Robert Moses Power Dam in Massena, NY.

Since starting my internship with NYPA, I have had the privilege to collaborate with and work alongside other engineers in the Electrical Maintenance team. In my first few weeks, I have been introduced to a field that is completely new to me and I am honored to have this opportunity to learn about power systems from such a reputable organization.

I have already had the opportunity to view most of the Robert Moses Power Dam and a few of the substations that are maintained by this facility. In my first few weeks, I have done work related to the most recent arc flash study, as well as take a deeper look into some of the relay systems here in the dam.

In the future, I hope to contribute to the NYPA team and prove myself as a valuable resource for both the Electrical Maintenance team and the Authority.

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Summer Intern Series

Summer Intern Series: Aaron D. White

photo1The New York Power Authority’s (NYPA) intern program provides top college students with the opportunity to gain broad experience working for the nation’s largest public power organization.

Aaron D. White attends SUNY Institute of Technology, working towards a degree in Electrical Engineering Technology. He currently works in the Technical Services group at the Energy Control Center (ECC) at Clark Energy Center in Marcy, NY.

The focus of my work has been on the Energy Management System – the ECC is a 24/7/365 operation, dealing with scheduled and emergent equipment outages as they come in, most requiring immediate attention and intervention. This internship is truly fitting for me as I also work as a NYS EMT and deal with urgent matters at all hours of the day.

One of my first impressions of this impressive facility when arriving was the sheer importance of the ECC to coordinating the “dance” between generation and load of the Bulk Electric System of New York State. One of my tasks at the ECC has been reviewing and cross-checking transformer and line data, which has given me an understanding of the inner workings of the modeling of the electric system. This has allowed me to see how infrastructure and computer systems work together, as well as the problems that engineers face with managing both.

I have had the privilege of working with some incredible people that have taken time out of their busy schedule to share their vast knowledge of what is done here at the ECC, specifically Brent Blanchard and Chris Powers, as well as my supervisor Derrick Piper. In just the few short weeks I’ve been here, this internship has already increased my appreciation of the electric utility industry from an energy consumption perspective. I’ve also taken notice to things like the overhead BES transmission lines and where they are terminating as I am driving home. I look forward to my continued time here with NYPA and the ECC as I continue to learn and broaden my horizons in the power systems field.

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Summer Intern Series

Summer Intern Series: Nathanael Kankiewicz

Kankiewicz237pxThe New York Power Authority’s (NYPA) intern program provides top college students with the opportunity to gain broad experience working for the nation’s largest public power organization. This summer, more than 30 undergraduate and graduate students are participating in the intern program. Throughout the summer, we will feature individual profiles of our summer interns and provide a detailed look at their personal internship experiences.

Nathanael Kankiewicz attends SUNY Buffalo State, working towards a degree in Electrical Engineering Technology with a focus on electronics and smart grid technology. He currently works in the Instrumentation & Controls unit within the Operations Group at the Niagara Power Project in Lewiston, NY.

Every day in the Instrumentation & Controls Department is different. There are a variety of devices we install and monitor, and I have had the opportunity to visit locations besides the Lewiston plant to inspect our instruments. I have also been offered a chance to learn how to react and assess the situations surrounding a fault. Under the guidance of Jim Rankin and Daniel Ver, I have taken every chance I can get to absorb the information this experience offers.

Over the past couple of weeks, I have been updating our satellite clock distribution network for protective devices. The goal of this work is to set up the infrastructure for their synchronization. This will allow for greater accuracy in our data collection and evaluation of events, both in testing and in regular operation.

My most recent work involved researching component information, and contacting manufacturers about items that need to be ordered. This work will continue with the writing of purchasing requests for the system I am currently designing.

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Summer Intern Series

Summer Intern Series: Sharika Chowdhury


The New York Power Authority’s (NYPA) intern program provides top college students with the opportunity to gain broad experience working for the nation’s largest public power organization. This summer, more than 30 undergraduate and graduate students are participating in the intern program. Throughout the summer we will feature individual profiles of our summer interns and provide a detailed look at their personal internship experiences.

Sharika Chowdhury attends NYU Polytech, pursuing a degree in Information Technology, specifically in Electricial Engineering. Sharika works in Operations and Support Services Unit at the Poletti Plant in Queens, NY.

My first week of interning at NYPA has been an overwhelmingly positive experience. In my short time here, I have already expanded my horizons by gaining valuable knowledge and an understanding of power systems in a medium unparalleled elsewhere.

I had the privilege of visiting the 500-MW Combined-Cycle Power Plant, which gave unique insight and greater comprehension of the technologies and processes involved in power generation and transmission. I have gained an appreciation of how NYPA generates the power needed to service New York City residents. Additionally, I learned of the various projects NYPA is working on and the vital role meter engineers play in the success of these projects.

Moving forward, I look to be a valuable contributor to NYPA through diligently expanding my knowledge base and working alongside NYPA professionals. I appreciate this opportunity and I thank my supervisor, Frank Ronci, for his guidance and support, ensuring my success at NYPA.

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NYPA Engineers, NYPA Staff, Women In Engineering

NYPA Recognizes its Women in Engineering: Katie O’Toole

Throughout March, we posted a series of interviews with NYPA’s female engineers in honor of Women’s History Month. The last post features a Q&A session with Katie O’Toole.

1. How did you enter the engineering field? How did you decide on your specialty? In high school, I excelled in math and science, and with my dad as a role model I thought engineering would be a good fit for me. Through my studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, I took an Intro to Electrical Engineering class and I knew that that was what I wanted to do. Not only did I find it interesting, but I knew that going into the power industry would provide job security, since everyone needs electricity.

2. Did you have a female engineer as a mentor? No.

3. What makes you proud to work at NYPA? How long have you worked here? I am proud to work for NYPA because it is a well-known company dedicated to delivering low-cost, reliable clean energy to all of New York.  I have worked at NYPA for 2 years and 10 months.

Kathryn O'Toole

Katie O’Toole

4. How many positions have you held at NYPA? One. I am an Associate Electrical Engineer with the Electrical Engineering Group.

5. What things do you love most about engineering? What I love the most about engineering is that there is something new to learn every day, whether it is a new piece of equipment or system to learn about. Technology is always changing, making it is so important to know what is available and how to use it properly.

6. What are the most difficult aspects of your job? What parts do you enjoy the most? The most difficult and enjoyable part of engineering is that no two jobs are the same. While you might have some background knowledge of a similar project that will be helpful, there are always new challenges to work through which keep things interesting and exciting.

7. What project that you have worked on are you most proud of? The project that I am most excited and proud of being a part of is the Lewiston Pump Generating Plant Life Extension Modernization (LPGP LEM) project because it is such a big undertaking that involves coordination between so many different people and equipment. It is fascinating to see how carefully all the phases of this project are planned and actuated successfully.

8. Did you face any obstacles in becoming an engineer? If so, which was the biggest one? Yes, when I started college I had professors tell me that I would never make it as an engineer because I did not pick things up as quickly as other students and that I should consider other career options. That gave me the drive to work even harder to reach my goal of becoming an engineer. Not only did I graduate and find a job as an electrical engineer right out of school, but I graduated on the Dean’s List.

9. What valuable lessons have you learned as your career as a female engineer has evolved? I have learned no matter what gets thrown your way, to take things one step at a time. Breaking down overall jobs into individual tasks makes them much easier to tackle and much less intimidating.

10. What advice would you offer young women considering engineering as a profession? There is no such thing as routine work in engineering, you need to be willing to step up to the plate and not be afraid to take on whatever challenges are thrown your way.

11. If you had to use one word to describe your opinion of the engineering profession, what would it be? One word I would use to describe the engineering profession is multifaceted, because not only are there a vast amount of projects that you can get thrown into, but there are many different steps that must be taken from a conceptual design, to construction, to a fully functioning system.

12. What is one thing about yourself that most people would find surprising? One thing that people might find surprising about me is that I am a professional USA gymnastics coach.

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NYPA Engineers, NYPA Staff, Women In Engineering

NYPA Recognizes its Women in Engineering: Lindsey McCloy

Throughout March, we’ll be posting a series of interviews with NYPA’s female engineers in honor of Women’s History Month. Today’s entry features a Q&A session with NYPA Assistant Research & Technology Development Engineer II Lindsey McCloy.

1. How did you enter the engineering field and decide on your specialty? Growing up, I always viewed science and math as tools to discover solutions to big world problems, and I think that’s why I tracked toward engineering as a career.  I settled on mechanical engineering in college because the discipline allowed me to explore many areas of interest, including sustainable energy technology, materials science, design, complex systems, and breaking stuff.

Lindsey McCloy

Lindsey McCloy

2. Did you have a female engineer as a mentor? Though I haven’t had an official female engineering mentor, I would count as “informal mentors” my female friends and colleagues in engineering, to whom I frequently turn for advice and perspective.  I’m also reliant on a loose network that includes former professors, supervisors, colleagues at NYPA, and family members (my engineer dad, energy businessman grandfather, power system researcher boyfriend, and life expert mom) who let me pepper them with questions and who kindly dispense wisdom.  Officially speaking, I’ve been lucky to participate in NYPA’s mentoring program which paired me with Paul Belnick, and he’s been an invaluable source of guidance as I’ve begun my NYPA career.

3. What makes you proud to work at NYPA?  How long have you worked here? I have worked as an Assistant R&TD Engineer for about a year and a half, my first and only position so far at NYPA.  Everyone who works here, throughout all of the business units, is an inexhaustible trove of information, and they are so generous with their time and knowledge – they constantly amaze me!

4. What things do you love most about engineering? Engineering, as both an academic and professional discipline, is all about breaking down and reorienting seemingly intractable problems.  I really enjoy the interplay of rigor and creativity involved in engineering solutions.

5. What are the most difficult aspects of your job?  What parts do you enjoy the most? Paradoxically, I find the same thing both most challenging and most exciting:  the sheer amount of information and scope of the R&D department’s work.  Sometimes it feels like I’m always playing catch-up to get up to speed on a project in a new area, but finally grasping abstract notions (like “what is a power system”) and being able to speak the language of a project is a great feeling.

6. Did you face any obstacles in becoming an engineer? I think pretty much anyone who’s gone through engineering school would say the same thing (if they don’t, they’re a robot and you shouldn’t trust them):  engineering school is hard!  It seems as though it’s structured as an endurance test and that if you complete it, you’re equipped to handle pretty much anything an engineering career can throw at you.  Fortunately, so far that’s been the case!

7. What valuable lessons have you learned as your career as a female engineer has evolved? The biggest lesson I have learned so far is that networking, especially within the company, is extremely important. Building personal working relationships with people across the company, especially when your work spans sites and business units as mine has a tendency to, makes solving problems so much easier – when you’re tackling a new issue or project, already knowing who to talk to makes the solution much easier to find.

8. What advice would you offer young women considering engineering as a profession? Listen and observe, always.  The fastest way to learn is by listening to others and picking up details through observation, whether in the field, in a meeting, or in a brief conversation in the hall.   You never know when this information will be just the thing to help you solve a tough problem.

9. If you had to use one word to describe your opinion of the engineering profession, what would it be? Utilitarian.

10. What is one thing about yourself that people would find surprising? In 8th grade, I was the North Carolina state champion in the National Geographic Bee, so you can trust me with directions!

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