Life of a Lightbulb

Life of a Lightbulb: George Washington Bridge

Did you know the George Washington Bridge carries across over 106 million cars per year? That’s pretty cool! Leddy the LED lightbulb here.

Back in 2009, my friends and I decided that the George Washington Bridge needed some new lights, so we replaced the existing necklace lighting with energy-efficient LED necklace lighting. The lighting helps to reduce glare for drivers, but the real benefit is that they require less maintenance, which leads to less opportunity for maintenance workers to experience a safety-related accident. This also leads to less traffic jams due to lane closures for maintenance. Nearly 200 of my friends were installed, which will lead to the elimination of almost 90 tons of greenhouse gases from our environment.

My friends and I encourage you to learn more about NYPA’s many Energy Efficiency projects. You might also want to look into replacing your bulbs with our family of LED bulbs – we come in all shapes and sizes and we always have bright ideas!

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Life of a Lightbulb

Life of a Lightbulb: SUNY University at Buffalo

Who’s up for a game of football? I know I am. It’s Leddy the LED lightbulb again!

This time, my friends and I are at SUNY Buffalo’s 31,000-seat football stadium. We worked with our friends at NYPA to help give them a new lighting system, including new, energy-efficient lights. Their lighting controls now allow for three different levels of lighting. Level 1 is used during practice, when less light is needed. Level 2 is used for non-broadcasted games, where Level 3 is extra-bright for HD broadcasting enhancement. Their lighting upgrades will help cut over 3,500 tons of greenhouses gases per year from the environment. (Personally, I like Level 3 so I can watch it on TV!)

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Life of a Lightbulb

Life of a Lightbulb: New York Hall of Science

I’m Leddy, the LED lightbulb. My friends and I like to help people by saving them money and making the environment “greener”. Did you know that we use 75% less energy than regular lightbulbs? Pretty neat, right? A bunch of my friends decided to help the New York Hall of Science to become more energy-efficient. They have over 450 exhibits and activities that explain science, technology, engineering and math. With new, energy-efficient LED bulbs like me installed, they’ll be able to better preserve the displays & exhibits, since the bulbs do not give off harmful UV rays. Over 2,000 of my LED lightbulb friends decided to move in to the Hall of Science so that we can also help the environment by eliminating over 200 tons of harmful greenhouse gases per year.

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